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The matrix for »Tombeau pour cinq cent mille soldats«
The matrix for »Tombeau pour cinq cent mille soldats«

Pierre Guyotat

The Prison

Our prison was encircled by marshland where birds and sick dogs came to die. At night we could hear their cries and death rattles. We could see nothing of the town except its smoke and its dying animals. Prisoners on the second floor watched those washed-out cats and dogs die, lying down then struggling in the mud like birds caught in lime; famished cats jumped on those with gaping wounds and tore them open. From the cellar where we had been...
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  • Krieg
  • Kriegserfahrung

 

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Mário Gomes

Über literarische Sprengkraft

Kaum etwas setzt schneller Rost an als Kriegsgerät und Literatur. Da nützt weder Pflege noch Wartung, am besten ist es, man lässt das Material einrosten und rüstet derweil am anderen Ende nach, erweitert Bestände, feilt an Technologien und poliert vor allem die Oberflächen auf Hochglanz, bzw. man nimmt den einfachen Weg und lässt eine Glanzschicht auftragen – einen feinen, seidenen Film –, denn so geht das heutzutage: man trägt auf. Dieser chemische Glanz der Panzer und Bücher kommt von der Sprühdose. Er hält allerdings nicht lange, sondern schwindet, sobald das Auge sich abwendet, und das Auge wendet sich schnell ab. Wo der Blick dann aber als nächstes hin eilt, glitzert und funkelt es wieder: bei jeder Militärparade wie bei jeder Buchmesse.

Dieser Glanz ist jedoch bei weitem nicht das einzige, was Krieg und Literatur verbindet. Ihre Verknüpfungen sind vielfältig und verworren. Wo Gewalt aufhört und das Schriftzeichen anfängt, ist selten klar,...

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Diane Williams

How about some string?

I said “Would you like a rope? You know that haul you have is not secured properly.”
“No,” he said, “but I see you have string!”
“If this comes into motion—” I said, “you should use a rope.”
“Any poison ivy on that? ” he asked me, and I told him my rope had been in the barn peacefully for years.
He took a length of it to the bedside table. He had no concept for what wood could endure.
“Table must have broken when I lashed it onto the truck,” he said.
And, when he was moving the sewing machine, he let the cast iron wheels—bang, bang on the stair.
I had settled down to pack up the flamingo cookie jar, the cutlery, and the cookware, but stopped briefly, for how many times do you catch sudden sight of something heartfelt?
I saw our milk cows in their slow...

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Let’s find the stage of human affairs
Let’s find the stage of human affairs

Marion Muller-Colard, Clémence Pollet

Hannah Arendt's Little Theater

While about to finish her last book, the philosopher Hannah Arendt is disturbed by her stubborn alter ego, 9-year-old Little Hannah. Reluctantly, the old woman lets herself drag out onto the streets of New York and into constant conversation by the inquisitive little girl. They enter a little theatre, and together they watch mankind, society, politics, power evolve – and they also experience the role of Evil (in the person of a wolf and of numerous wooden puppets) and its...
  • Junge Leser
  • Denken
  • Ethik
  • Handeln
  • Das Böse
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Maria Filomena Molder

So many egoists call themselves artists…

“So many egoists call themselves artists,” Rimbaud wrote to Paul Demeny on May 15, 1871. Even though that is not always obvious, ‘I’, the first person, is the most unknown person, a mystery that is constantly moving towards the other two, the second and third persons, a series of unfoldings and smatterings that eventually gelled as ‘Je est un autre’. That is why ‘apocryphal’ is a literarily irrelevant concept and ‘pseudo’ a symptom, the very proof that life, writing, is made up of echoes, which means that intrusions and thefts (Borges also discusses them) will always be the daily bread of those who write.

Words from others, words taken out of place and mutilated: here are the alms of time, that squanderer’s sole kindness. And so many others, mostly others who wrote, and many other pages, all of them apocryphal, all of them echoes, reflections. All this flows together into—two centuries...

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